The Empathy Initiative
Transforming Healthcare Education & Practice
  Project Overview   The objective of this project was to develop a conceptual framework outlining processes involved in patient-centred nursing and compassion satisfaction or compassion fatigue in critical care nursing. The aggressive, curative setting of the intensive care unit may compromise compassionate patient-centred nursing. ICU nurses are expected to employ clinical expertise while delivering compassionate nursing care; they are at high risk of anxiety and fatigue. Compassion satisfaction fatigue influence nurses’ intention to leave; workforce turnover is high. A mixed methods explanatory sequential design, underpinned by constructivist methodology was adopted. Findings revealed the experience of compassion satisfaction or fatigue impacts the capacity of critical care nurses to deliver compassionate patient-centred nursing. Overall, critical care nurses have mid-range levels of compassion satisfaction and fatigue. Workplace, education, experience, age and tenure were found to be predictive and contributing factors to compassion satisfaction and fatigue. Early to mid-career critical care nurses were at greatest risk. Moments of compassion satisfaction and fatigue may occur along a continuum, keeping time with critical care nurses’ expectations being met and their ability to meet perceived expectations. Applying Bowen Family Systems Theory to intensive care nursing resulted in new knowledge and recommendations to develop workplace culture and enhance critical care nurses’ compassion satisfaction.   Publications   Jakimowicz, S., Perry, L., & Lewis, J. (2017). An integrative review of supports, facilitators and barriers to patient-centred nursing in the intensive care unit.  Journal of Clinical Nursing.  26(23-24), 4153-4171. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28699268   Jakimowicz, S., Stirling, C. & Duddle, M. (2015). An investigation of factors that impact patients' subjective experience of nurse-led clinics: a qualitative systematic review.  Journal of Clinical Nursing.  24(1-2), 19-33.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25236376   Jakimowicz, S. & Perry, L. (2015). A concept analysis of patient-centred nursing in the intensive care unit.  Journal of Advanced Nursing.  71(7), 1499-1517.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25720454    

Compassion in ICU

Patient-centred nursing, compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue in Australian intensive care units

  Project Overview   The objective of this project was to develop a conceptual framework outlining processes involved in patient-centred nursing and compassion satisfaction or compassion fatigue in critical care nursing. The aggressive, curative setting of the intensive care unit may compromise compassionate patient-centred nursing. ICU nurses are expected to employ clinical expertise while delivering compassionate nursing care; they are at high risk of anxiety and fatigue. Compassion satisfaction fatigue influence nurses’ intention to leave; workforce turnover is high. A mixed methods explanatory sequential design, underpinned by constructivist methodology was adopted. Findings revealed the experience of compassion satisfaction or fatigue impacts the capacity of critical care nurses to deliver compassionate patient-centred nursing. Overall, critical care nurses have mid-range levels of compassion satisfaction and fatigue. Workplace, education, experience, age and tenure were found to be predictive and contributing factors to compassion satisfaction and fatigue. Early to mid-career critical care nurses were at greatest risk. Moments of compassion satisfaction and fatigue may occur along a continuum, keeping time with critical care nurses’ expectations being met and their ability to meet perceived expectations. Applying Bowen Family Systems Theory to intensive care nursing resulted in new knowledge and recommendations to develop workplace culture and enhance critical care nurses’ compassion satisfaction.   Publications   Jakimowicz, S., Perry, L., & Lewis, J. (2017). An integrative review of supports, facilitators and barriers to patient-centred nursing in the intensive care unit.  Journal of Clinical Nursing.  26(23-24), 4153-4171. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28699268   Jakimowicz, S., Stirling, C. & Duddle, M. (2015). An investigation of factors that impact patients' subjective experience of nurse-led clinics: a qualitative systematic review.  Journal of Clinical Nursing.  24(1-2), 19-33.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25236376   Jakimowicz, S. & Perry, L. (2015). A concept analysis of patient-centred nursing in the intensive care unit.  Journal of Advanced Nursing.  71(7), 1499-1517.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25720454    

Project Overview

The objective of this project was to develop a conceptual framework outlining processes involved in patient-centred nursing and compassion satisfaction or compassion fatigue in critical care nursing. The aggressive, curative setting of the intensive care unit may compromise compassionate patient-centred nursing. ICU nurses are expected to employ clinical expertise while delivering compassionate nursing care; they are at high risk of anxiety and fatigue. Compassion satisfaction fatigue influence nurses’ intention to leave; workforce turnover is high. A mixed methods explanatory sequential design, underpinned by constructivist methodology was adopted. Findings revealed the experience of compassion satisfaction or fatigue impacts the capacity of critical care nurses to deliver compassionate patient-centred nursing. Overall, critical care nurses have mid-range levels of compassion satisfaction and fatigue. Workplace, education, experience, age and tenure were found to be predictive and contributing factors to compassion satisfaction and fatigue. Early to mid-career critical care nurses were at greatest risk. Moments of compassion satisfaction and fatigue may occur along a continuum, keeping time with critical care nurses’ expectations being met and their ability to meet perceived expectations. Applying Bowen Family Systems Theory to intensive care nursing resulted in new knowledge and recommendations to develop workplace culture and enhance critical care nurses’ compassion satisfaction.

Publications

Jakimowicz, S., Perry, L., & Lewis, J. (2017). An integrative review of supports, facilitators and barriers to patient-centred nursing in the intensive care unit. Journal of Clinical Nursing. 26(23-24), 4153-4171.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28699268

Jakimowicz, S., Stirling, C. & Duddle, M. (2015). An investigation of factors that impact patients' subjective experience of nurse-led clinics: a qualitative systematic review. Journal of Clinical Nursing. 24(1-2), 19-33.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25236376

Jakimowicz, S. & Perry, L. (2015). A concept analysis of patient-centred nursing in the intensive care unit. Journal of Advanced Nursing. 71(7), 1499-1517. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25720454

 

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